Saturday, November 18, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ Pitman of Marblehead, Massachusetts



PITMAN / PITTMAN / PETMAN / PICKMAN

Thomas Pitman, my 10th great grandfather, was born about 1614 in England. His origins and his parents are unknown, but he had a brother named John Pitman who might have come over with him at the same time.   It is unknown when he first arrived in Salem, Massachusetts, and he lived in the part of town that became Marblehead.  He married a woman named Joan or Jane and had six children recorded in Salem.

Thomas Pitman made a will in 1694 and died that year.  He left his house to his son Thomas Pitman, and the rest of his estate to his daughters Sarah Dodd and Mary Fortune, and to the children of his brother John.  His house and land were sold on 21 March 1716/17 to Reverend John Barnard of Marblehead, who took down the house. [Essex Registry of Deeds, book 32, leaf 98].  Thomas Pitman, Jr. was married twice, first to Mary Dennis, and second to Margaret (Gould) Stilson, my 8th great grandmother in another lineage.  Margaret was taken prisoner by Indians in Maine who had killed her husband and child in 1689. She was taken to Quebec with her daughter Mary, and ransomed back in 1695.

The daughter of Thomas Pitman and Joan, Mary (Pitman) Fortune, is my 9th great grandmother.  She married Elias Fortune and had thirteen children.  See the lineage below.

For more information on Thomas Pitman see the book Marblehead in the Year 1700 by Sidney Perley, 1910, pages 36 and 61.  This book has been digitized and is available online at the Marblehead Museum website http://marbleheadmuseum.org/Marblehead-1700.pdf  

Also, Sidney A. Merriam, "Notes of Pitman Documents", The American Genealogist, Volume 18, pages 17 - 19. 

My PITMAN Genealogy:

Generation 1:  Thomas Pitman, born about 1614 in England, died July 1694 in Marblehead, Massachusetts; married about 1643 in Salem, Massachusetts to Joan or Jane Unknown. Six children born in Salem:
1.  Joseph Pitman, born about 1644– no further information
2.  Sarah Pitman, born about 1646, married Thomas Dodd
3.  Mary Pitman, born about 1648 , (see below – my 9th great grandmother)
4. Elizabeth Pitman, born about 1650, married Henry Russell
5.  Thomas Pitman, born about 1652, married first Mary Dennis, married second to Margaret Gould, widow of James Stilson, (my 8th great grandparents)
6.  John Pitman, born about 1660, died 1696 in Barbadoes, m. Charity Gale

Generation 2: Mary Pitman, born about 1648 in Salem, died 1734 in Marblehead; married about 1669 to Elias Fortune.  He was born about 1640 in England and died November 1705 in Marblehead. Thirteen chidren.

Generation 3:  Mary Fortune m. Samuel Hoyle
Generation 4: Mary Hoyle m. Peter Homan
Generation 5: William Homan m. Elizabeth Unknown
Generation 6:  Thomas Homan m. Tabitha Glover
Generation 7: Betsey Jillings Homan m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 8: Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9: Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10: Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ Pitman of Marblehead, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 18, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/surname-saturday-pitman-of-marblehead.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, November 17, 2017

Along The Pilgrim Trail ~ Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrim Fathers were Jailed

Along the Pilgrim Trail,  Part 15


IN THESE CELLS
WILLIAM BRADFORD       WILLIAM BREWSTER
and others afterwards known as
THE PILGRIM FATHERS
WERE IMPRISONED
on the 23rd September 1607
after attempting to escape to
religious freedom


Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

Boston, Lincolnshire has many connections to the Mayflower passengers and to the Great Migration of Puritans to New England.  Our first stop in Boston was to the Guildhall.  In yesterday's post I described how the Scrooby Separatists were arrested at Fishtoft in 1607, and taken to the jail in the Boston Guildhall.  Today's post picks up on the rest of that story.

Boston Guildhall

The Boston Guildhall dates from the late 1300s. It was built for the Guild of St. Mary the Blessed Virgin.  This guild sold indulgences, which provided members with priests to say masses for the deceased for their eternal salvation. Members gave money and land for these indulgences. This practice made the guild very wealthy and influential in the middle ages, and the city of Boston prospered.  But it was also a corrupt system that the Protestants wanted abolished.

After the Guild of St. Mary was abolished, the Guildhall was used for civic purposes, such as the Quarter Session court  where the Scrooby Separatist men were jailed and held for trial. The men were imprisoned a month and since there were many Puritans in town, most of the men were released and returned home to Nottinghamshire and North Lincolnshire.  Seven Scrooby leaders, which must have included Brewster and Bradford were held in jail for the high court. It is unknown if that court session was ever held because the men were free to return with the others soon after.

But, they would try to reach Holland the following year in 1608. Stayed tuned for more about the escape to The Netherlands in the next blog post!

St. Botolph's Church

We also visited St. Botolph's church while we were in Boston. The first church here was built on the site of Botolph's own monastery in 654.  In the 14th century a grand new church was built here to reflect how prosperous Boston had become, thanks to the wealthy Guildhall. It is known as "The Stump" or "The Boston Stump" because of it's tall, 272 foot tower which appears to be unfinished by a spire. The church tower can be seen for miles because the area around the city of Boston is a flat watershed known as "The Fens".

In the 1600s, Rev. John Cotton began preaching his non-conformist ideas at St. Botolph's church.  He was very popular, and gained thousands of followers, including many families of gentry who removed to Boston to be part of his parish.  In 1630 Thomas Dudley, Simon Bradstreet and other Boston leaders removed to Massachusetts with a large number of his congregation, as part of the Winthrop Fleet.  Rev. John Cotton himself removed to Boston, Massachusetts in 1633.

"1630. John Cotton bids farewell to his parishoners on the Arbella"
a window inside St. Botolph's church




The Rev. John Cotton chapel inside St. Botolph's church



The Cotton Chapel inside St. Botolph's church is named for Rev. John Cotton.  There is a "Puritan Pathway" outside of the church with memorial markers for famous Puritans who left Boston, Lincolnshire for Boston, Massachusetts.  You might recognize some of these 12 names - Anne Hutchinson, Lady Arbella Johnson, John Winthrop, and Thomas Leverett (all were influential and important early settlers in the Massachusetts Bay Colony).  In 1999 the Partnership of Historic Bostons was established to help preserve and publicize the relationship between the two Bostons.

"FOR WE MUST CONSIDER THAT WE SHALL BE
AS A CITY UPON A HILL.
THE EYES OF ALL PEOPLE ARE UPON US"
GOVERNOR JOHN WINTHROP
ON BOARD THE "ARBELLA"
1630


For more information:

The Partnership of Historic Bostons:  http://www.historicbostons.com/

The Boston Guildhall:   http://www.bostonguildhall.co.uk/

St. Botolph's Church: https://parish-of-boston.org.uk/church/st-botolphs/

A six minute video of the Puritan Path in Boston, Lincolnshire:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_K_R_u4L5Fk 

Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:



Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey":

Part 7 of this series "Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire":

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-fishtoft.html 

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrim Fathers were Jailed", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 17, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-boston-lincolnshire.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were Betrayed!

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 14

The Pilgrim Monument at Fishtoft

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

In 1607 the Scrooby congregation of Separatists decided to leave England due to the persecutions of many of their members. They decided to go to Holland, where they could worship without fear.

The Scrooby Separatists hired a barge to leave from the small village of Fishtoft, Lincolnshire which would take them to a ship over the North Sea to Holland.  Fishtoft is 60 miles from Scrooby, a village in the tidal marshes off The Haven ( the River Witham which drains the Fens).  The barge was to leave a small brook or creek known as Scotia creek.  From here you can see the tower of St. Botolph's church in nearby Boston, Lincolnshire.

Once the Separatists boarded the barge, the group was seized by officers who put them into open boats and carried them back upriver to Boston.  The men and women were searched bodily.  Money, books and possessions were seized.  The men were arrested and imprisoned in the Guildhall.

Stay tuned for the next episode to find out what happened next in Boston!

Near this place in September 1607
those later known as the
Pilgrim Fathers
were thwarted in their first attempt to sail
to find religious freedom across the seas.

Memorial re-worded by
the generous gift of the National Association of
Congregational Christian Churches
and the First Congregational Church of Wauwatosa,
WI, USA - 2009

By the way, according to Wikipedia, the original wording on this monument used to read "Near this place in September 1607 those later known as "The Pilgrim Fathers" made their first attempt to find religious freedom across the seas.  Erected 1957".  It was erected in 1957 on the 350th anniversary of the event.

Mayflower descendants along the creek
in Fishtoft, Lincolnshire, walking the dike
towards the Pilgrim Fathers Monument

An audience of cows

Vincent and Yours Truly at the Pilgrim Monument
The spire of St. Botolph's church can
be seen over the cabbage fields from Fishtoft


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey":

Part 7 of this series "Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire":

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":


----------------------------------


Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Fishtoft,  Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 17, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-fishtoft.html: accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Lock Up in England

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in England.

Do you know the location of weather vane #337?  Scroll down to see the answer...





This is the weathervane from on top of the 17th century clocktower and lock up (the town jail) in the middle of Fenstanton, in Cambridgeshire, England on the High Street.  We were passing through the town to visit the church of St. Peter and St. Paul where the parents of Mayflower passenger John Howland are buried.  We spied this interesting building and its weathervane out the window of the tour bus.  Luckily we were able to get a few good photos!

The weathervane is a simple banner. It is probably original to the building, although the building was restored in 1989.


A 1941 painting  "Clock Tower, Fen Stanton" by Edward Walker (b. 1879)
from the Victoria and Albert Museum website 
https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1105366/the-clock-tower-fen-stanton-watercolour-walker-edward/  



------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Lock Up in England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 15, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/weathervane-wednesday-lock-up-in-england.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Along The Pilgrim Trail ~ James Chilton and Canterbury, Kent, England

Along the Pilgrim Trail, #13

St. Paul without the Walls, Canterbury, Kent



Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

It is possible that James Chilton (about 1556 - 1620) was born in Canterbury, Kent, England.   He was made a freeman in 1583 in Canterbury, and was described as a tailor. His eight children were born and baptized here, at the church of St. Paul-without-the-walls, and then removed to Sandwich where he had three more children.  The name of his wife is not on any record. This church gets its curious name because it is outside of the original medieval walled city of Canterbury.

Sometime after 1609, when his wife was charged with a secret burial of a child, they left for Leiden, Holland.  He was recorded in Leiden when he sought the services of a local doctor after being stoned in a religious riot in 1619.  His oldest daughter, Isabella, married Roger Chandler in Leiden on 2 July 1615. Another daughter, Angel, married Robert Nelson in Leiden in 1622, and remarried in Leiden to Daniel Pietersz in 1636, and to Matthijs Tilligem in 1637.  A daughter, Christina, married Joris Abrahamsz in Leiden in 1635, and to Dionys Van Steenstraten in Leiden in 1636.

James, his unknown wife, and their youngest daughter, Mary, went to New England on board the Mayflower.  James and his wife died that first winter in the New World, but his daughter survived.   James Chilton is famous for being the oldest passenger on board the Mayflower, about 64 years old.  Isabella and her husband Roger Chandler came to Plymouth around 1629.


Canterbury Cathedral


While we were in Canterbury with the Mayflower Tour we also visited the famous cathedral. It's gorgeous exterior was under scaffolding, but we enjoyed the church very much. This cathedral was the site of the murder of St. Thomas Becket in 1170, and is now a holy place and the mother church for Anglican community.  It was a place of pilgrimage for many years.

The place where St. Thomas was martyred

Steps worn by centuries of pilgrims

Robert Cushman (1577 - 1625), who grandfathered, many Mayflower descendants, had apprenticeship records near Canterbury Cathedral at the church of St. George the Martyr.  He was apprenticed to a grocer in 1597.  This church was destroyed in World War II by German bombing, but the tower still remains.  It was also where the playwright Christopher Marlowe, and contemporary of William Shakespeare, was baptized.  There was a plaque to Marlowe, but no signage for Cushman here.

Robert Cushman was in Leiden, Holland with the Separatists.  He spent much time preparing the group for their colony in the New World, and was a purchasing agent for the Virginia Company. He wrote a book "Cry of a Stone" in 1619, which was published in 1642, an account of the Separtist's years in Leiden.  He came to New England in 1621 on board the Fortune, with his son Thomas Cushman, who married Mary Allerton in Plymouth in 1636.

St. George The Martyr church tower
home church of Robert Cushman

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE
Dramatist
BAPTISED IN THIS CHURCH
26TH FEBRUARY 1564
DIED AT DEPTFORD
30TH MAY 1598


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:

Part 5 this series "Upper Clatford, Hampshire"
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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ James Chilton and Canterbury, Kent, England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 14, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-james-chilton-and.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, November 13, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Francis Eaton of Bristol, England

Along the Pilgrim Trail, part 12

St. Thomas the Martyr Church, Bristol, England

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

The maritime city of Bristol, England was the hometown of Mayflower passenger Francis Eaton.  He was baptized at St. Thomas the Martyr church in Bristol on 11 September 1596, the son of John Eaton and Dorothy Smith.  Francis Eaton was a house carpenter.  He married a woman named Sarah and had a son named Samuel.  Francis signed the Mayflower Compact.  In the first winter, his wife died. He remarried to another unknown woman named Dorothy, who also died.  His third wife, Christian Penn, had three Eaton children, then she remarried to Francis Billington, Jr. and had nine Billington children.  Francis Eaton died in 1633 in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Samuel Eaton, who came on the Mayflower as a baby, lived and married first to a woman named Elizabeth who had two children. Then he married Martha Billington, his step-sister, a daughter of his step-mother Christian with her marriage to Francis Billington.  He had four children with Martha. He died in 1684 in Middleborough, Massachusetts.


Francis Eaton descendants in front
of the former St. Thomas Church
where Francis Eaton was baptized.

THE CHURCHES CONSERVATION TRUST
St. Thomas the Martyr, Bristol
This church is cared for by
The Churches Conservation Trust,
the national charity protecting
historic churches at risk.
Although no longer used for regular worship,
our churches remain consecrated
and open to all.



Bristol, England is the westernmost port in England, which created early trade with Ireland and made it the port city for many early voyages to the New World.  John Cabot left here in 1487, and there is a monument to him, Cabot Tower, overlooking the seaport.  The Triangular Trade from England to Africa to the New World and back to England centered mostly on ships sailing from Bristol, which made it a center for slavery in England, and also a center for abolition since Thomas Clarkson lived in Bristol and reported on slavery from the Seven Stars pub.  There is also a replica of the SS Great Britain, built by Isambard K. Brunel, on the Bristol waterfront.

SS Great Britain

The Seven Stars Public House,
where Thomas Clarkson researched
Bristol's slave trade.


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-scrooby-manor.html  

Part 3 of this series "Gainsborough, Lincolnshire"

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Upper Clatford, Hampshire"
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-stephen-hopkins-of.html

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-william-mullins-of.html

Part 7 of this series "Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-droitwich.html

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-fullers-of.html

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-john-howland-of.html

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-tilley-and-samson.html

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-william-bradford.html 


----------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Francis Eaton of Bristol, England", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 13, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/along-pilgrim-trail-francis-eaton-of.html: accessed [access date]).

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Veteran’s Day 2017 – Honor Roll Project Contributors

The World War I Honor Roll
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, Massachusetts
The Honor Roll project collects transcriptions of the names of the veterans on military honor rolls seen in parks, schools, public buildings, books and other places all over the USA and abroad.  You can read the complete list at this link:

Twice a year, for Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day, genealogy bloggers photograph and transcribe these honor rolls, and publish them on the internet.   The act of transcribing these names makes them available to be found by search engines such as Google, Mocavo and others.  Family members searching for genealogical or military information on relatives, ancestors or friends will be able to see the honor rolls, read the names, and learn about their family’s military history.

It is a simple, easy project.  However, it brings unexpected joy to searchers who did not know their ancestors were in the military, or did not know the specific military history, or sometimes they did not even know the town where their ancestors lived.  Seeing their family member’s name on an honor roll can be the beginning of finding more genealogy data, military records and historical information.

Here are this year’s contributions:

Connecticut
New Haven – Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Monument by the Historical Marker Database volunteers

Norwalk -  World War 1, Part 3, by Christine McCloud

Prospect, Revolutionary War, Civil War, World War I, by Jeanne Bryan Insalaco

Southbury, WWI, by Marian Burke

Wallingford, WWII Part 3 (surname F to I), by John Tew


Indiana
Batesville, WWII by Diane Schrader Anderson

Massachusetts
Attleboro
-          Revolutionary War by the Historical Marker Database volunteers
          – Korean War by the Historical Marker Database volunteers
Great Barrington - WWI by the Historical Marker Database volunteers

Stockbridge
          – Civil War by the Historical Marker Database volunteers
-          WWI by the Historical Marker Database volunteers
-          WWII by the Historical Marker Database volunteers
-          Korea by the Historical Marker Database volunteers
-          Vietnam by the Historical Marker Database volunteers


New Hampshire                     
Alton – Civil War Memorial by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers

Canaan – Civil War by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers

Candia – WWI, by Janice Webster Brown

Claremont – WWI, by Janice Webster Brown

Cornish and Plainfield – WWI by Janice Webster Brown

Enfield
-          Revolutionary War by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
           – Civil War Monument by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
-          WWI by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
-          WWII by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
-          Korean War by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
-          Vietnam by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
-          Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, Iraq by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers

Groveton and Northumberland – WWI by Janice Webster Brown

Hanover
-           WWII Memorial by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers

Lebanon
       – American Revolution by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers
-          WWI by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers

Littleton –WWI by Janice Webster Brown

Lyme – Civil War by the Historical Marker Database Volunteers

Rochester – WWI by Janice Webster Brown

Rye – WWI by Janice Webster Brown

Somersworth – WWI by Janice Webster Brown

Webster – June Stearns Butka, WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam

Whitefield -  Janice Webster Brown -  WWI


Texas
Corpus Christi, Nueces Country Courthouse, Korea and Vietname by Amanda Pape

Vermont
Bridgewater
 – WWII, Korea, Vietnam,  by the Historical Marker Database
-          WW1 by the Historical Marker Database

Chester -  Civil War by the Historical Marker Database
-          Vietnam by the Historical Marker Database

Plymouth – WWI Memorial by the Historical Marker Database

Putney – Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, Spanish American War, WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm/Desert Shield, Global War on Terrorism by the Historical Marker Database

Westminster – WWII by the Historical Marker Database

Weston
– Civil War by the Historical Marker Database
-Korea and Vietnam

Wales, United Kingdom
Lampeter, WWI by Michael Davies


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Veteran’s Day 2017 – Honor Roll Project Contributors", Nutfield Genealogy, posted November 11, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/11/veterans-day-2017-honor-roll-project.html: accessed [access date]).